Event Calendar

Primary tabs

November 2018

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
28
29
30
31
1
2
3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
 
 
Archaeological Secrets of Maryland

Archaeological Secrets of Maryland

Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 7:00pm
Event Location
Schmidt Conference Center

Title: Erosion and Sedimentation at the 19th-Century Sellman House

Speaker: Sarah Grady

Pre-registration Required
No

Event Details

Erosion is a leading cause of degradation to ecosystems. It combines natural forces like wind and water with human forces like tillage and everyday use of the land. One site—a former plantation called Sellman’s Connection at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center—provides a case study of the profound effects of daily land use by the Sellman and Kirkpatrick-Howat families. In this talk, citizen scientist Sarah Grady of the Smithsonian Environmental Archaeology Lab will highlight the unintentional ways these families altered the land over the short and long term, and outline a new method to document their impacts by analyzing artifacts and sediment. Free and open to all!

"Archaeological Secrets of Maryland" lectures will take place every second Tuesday of the month at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, now through December. Thanks to the Anne Arundel Chapter of the Archeological Society of Maryland for cosponsoring the series!

 

7:00PM
 
 
Stream Assessment and Restoration: A Case Study in Appalachian Surface Mining

Stream Assessment and Restoration: A Case Study in Appalachian Surface Mining

Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 11:00am
Event Location
Schmidt Conference Center

Speaker: Dr. Matt Baker, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Pre-registration Required
No

Event Details

Summary:
Matthew Baker is a Professor of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. 
His current research involves using drones to monitor sediment releases following the Bloede Dam removal on the Patapsco River; assessing stream restoration projects with low-altitude aerial imagery; characterizing the ecological diversity of urban woodlands in Maryland; describing heterogeneity within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study; ForestGEO long-term forest inventory; and automated mapping of high-resolution stream maps from LiDAR across the Chesapeake Bay watershed (with the Chesapeake Conservancy).  About five years ago, Matt began testifying in lawsuits that tried to hold the coal industry accountable for the effects of mountaintop mining under the Clean Water Act.  He has now testified in five federal cases.

Matt earned his masters from the University of Michigan in 1996 in Forest Ecology and a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology in 2002. He was a postdoctoral research associate at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and an assistant professor at Utah State University before returning to Maryland in 2008. Matt is a broadly trained landscape ecologist and ecohydrologist. 

Our Thursday science seminars are free and open to the public. Because they are directed towards a scientific audience, they are more technical than our evening lectures. Visit our Evening Lecture Page to learn more about our free evening lecture series.

11:00AM
 
 
 
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Nov 13, 2018

  • Archaeological Secrets of Maryland

    Archaeological Secrets of Maryland

    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 7:00pm
    Event Location
    Schmidt Conference Center

    Title: Erosion and Sedimentation at the 19th-Century Sellman House

    Speaker: Sarah Grady

    Pre-registration Required
    No

    Event Details

    Erosion is a leading cause of degradation to ecosystems. It combines natural forces like wind and water with human forces like tillage and everyday use of the land. One site—a former plantation called Sellman’s Connection at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center—provides a case study of the profound effects of daily land use by the Sellman and Kirkpatrick-Howat families. In this talk, citizen scientist Sarah Grady of the Smithsonian Environmental Archaeology Lab will highlight the unintentional ways these families altered the land over the short and long term, and outline a new method to document their impacts by analyzing artifacts and sediment. Free and open to all!

    "Archaeological Secrets of Maryland" lectures will take place every second Tuesday of the month at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, now through December. Thanks to the Anne Arundel Chapter of the Archeological Society of Maryland for cosponsoring the series!

     

    7:00PM

Nov 15, 2018

  • Stream Assessment and Restoration: A Case Study in Appalachian Surface Mining

    Stream Assessment and Restoration: A Case Study in Appalachian Surface Mining

    Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 11:00am
    Event Location
    Schmidt Conference Center

    Speaker: Dr. Matt Baker, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

    Pre-registration Required
    No

    Event Details

    Summary:
    Matthew Baker is a Professor of Geography & Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. 
    His current research involves using drones to monitor sediment releases following the Bloede Dam removal on the Patapsco River; assessing stream restoration projects with low-altitude aerial imagery; characterizing the ecological diversity of urban woodlands in Maryland; describing heterogeneity within the Baltimore Ecosystem Study; ForestGEO long-term forest inventory; and automated mapping of high-resolution stream maps from LiDAR across the Chesapeake Bay watershed (with the Chesapeake Conservancy).  About five years ago, Matt began testifying in lawsuits that tried to hold the coal industry accountable for the effects of mountaintop mining under the Clean Water Act.  He has now testified in five federal cases.

    Matt earned his masters from the University of Michigan in 1996 in Forest Ecology and a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology in 2002. He was a postdoctoral research associate at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and an assistant professor at Utah State University before returning to Maryland in 2008. Matt is a broadly trained landscape ecologist and ecohydrologist. 

    Our Thursday science seminars are free and open to the public. Because they are directed towards a scientific audience, they are more technical than our evening lectures. Visit our Evening Lecture Page to learn more about our free evening lecture series.

    11:00AM